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Would Gatling guns have saved Custer

The Guns Custer Left Behind Would Have Been a Burden. The 'Boy General' declined to take Gatlings to the Little Bighorn. Historical tragedies invariably demand scapegoats. The June 25-26, 1876, Battle of the Little Bighorn clearly illustrates this predictable human response to catastrophe. Some within the Army tried to affix. Short answer: Unlikely. The Gatling gun, as well modern machine guns, are what are known in military parlance as force multipliers. The work of a large group of soldiers is done by just one or a few, or at least has that effect. Gatling guns cou.. In practical terms, Custer had a point when he declined to take the guns along. They were heavy and cumbersome, each requiring a team of four horses to haul the guns and caissons. Reno had brought them on his earlier scout to find the hostiles' tr.. Custer left the Gatling guns behind and for good reason. Bringing them would have greatly slowed the march. In all likelyhood, there wouldn't have been a battle at Little Bighorn. The Sioux would have escaped. True but wargaming isn't just about modeling and duplicating history. One of the most intriguing aspects of our hobby is [ Custer and the Gatling guns. There has been much speculation about how the outcome of the Battle of the Little Bighorn could have been different if Custer had taken the gatling guns. It has also been written that Custer didn't want to take them because he thought they would slow him down. Whether this is speculation or he actually said this.

Nonetheless, at the time, the Gatling gun did project an intimidating presence on any battlefield, and the Sioux warriors would have been at least nervous about going into battle against them. So in my opinion, the Gatling guns would have not won Custer the day, but could have prevented the major disaster that did occur Custer also believed that the use of such a devastating weapon would cause him to lose face with the Indians. Whether or not the Gatlings could have saved Custer and his 200 men is questionable

The Gatling Gun was a deadly innovation that would influence many other guns, Whether or not the Gatlings could have saved Custer and his 200 men is questionable. Some accounts report the. The Gatling and later the machine gun were considered Artillery. The main form of employment of the Gatling was in barrage fire. That is, they fired at high elevation and dropped their projectiles in an area out to as far as 1100-1200 yards. This is how the Navy, the largest purchaser intended to use them too If the Indians were, in fact, better armed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Custer may have contributed to the situation by declining to include Gatling guns in his van. Because he was setting. For the sake of argument, though, let us suppose General Crook had fifty thousand men, dozens of cannons, and an array of Gatling guns - and the Battle of Little Bighorn had begun right before his.

Whether or not the Gatlings could have saved Custer and his 200 men is questionable. Some accounts report the column of Indians that retreated after the battle as being three miles long and a half-mile wide. During the next few years, the Gatling gun participated in a number of battles, including those with the Nez Perce Ernest M. Teagarden, The Guns Col. Custer Left Behind An entire alternate History has been written about the topic. link Another book says: :George Armstrong Custer did not have to die at the Little Big Horn. Victory, in the form of two Gatling Guns that he left behind, was always in his grasp. In 1882 - Custer in Chains, he not only. 12/03/0001 12:00 AM | by John Sammon. The Battle of the Little Big Horn, or Custer's Last Stand as it used to be called, has generated so much speculation and mythology over the years that new. Terry and Gibbon did offer Custer some reinforcements for the mission. Custer refused the battery of Gatling guns. Since the massive guns would have to be drawn by horses no longer fit for cavalry service, he felt they would be an impediment to his mobility. He also refused another group of cavalrymen, the 2nd Cavalry To travel quickly and lightly across the rough prairie, Custer had left behind three, six-barrel Colt 1866 Gatling guns in .50-70 at Fort Abraham Lincoln, North Dakota. While it would have been nice to have these rapid-fire (each averaging six rounds per second) weapons available for the battle, their loss ultimately would not have changed the.

British Gatling guns in action at the battle of Ulundi. At the Custer massacre Reno reached the neighboring bluffs and saved his command Custer, when attacked by overwhelming numbers, tried to do so, failed, and his command was exterminated. A battery or half-battery of Gatlings would have been a moving bluff, with power to. At the time the Gatling gun was developed, our opponents were still lining up in ranks and shooting at each other in static formations. The Gatling gun would have been used much like an artillery piece. What Custer really needed would have been Hawks with laser beams for eyeballs

The Guns Custer Left Behind Would Have Been a Burde

  1. It may be that the Battle of the Little Bighorn is the most written about subject in American history. For more than 120 years, people have speculated about how Lieutenant Colonel George A. Custer and five companies of the 7th Cavalry were overwhelmed in southeastern Montana Territory by a combined force of Lakota and Cheyenne Indians on June 25, 1876
  2. Custer takes his three Gatling Guns with him instead of leaving them at the Yellowstone River. The author, a retired Marine, came up with a plausible solution of how the heavy machine guns could have moved with the 7th Cavalry without slowing it down through rough terrain
  3. Why did Custer turn down Gatling guns? Another regiment would have been extremely useful to Custer, but he turned it down for two reasons First, he felt the 7th could handle the mission which was somewhat reasonable based on what he knew and expected at the time but also a little bit of conceit. What rifle did the 7th Cavalry use

The first Gatling gun consisted of a cluster of six rifle barrels, without stocks, arranged around a center rod. Whether or not the Gatlings could have saved Custer and his 200 men is. Custer Saved the Nation In defense of the man everyone loves to hate. May 7, Custer refused the battery of Gatling guns. Since the massive guns would have to be drawn by horses no longer fit for cavalry service, he felt they would be an impediment to his mobility. He also refused another group of cavalrymen, the 2nd Cavalry Gatling guns were not going to save Custer from his colossal tactical stupidity, he would have never got the chance to deploy them. Posted: 7/28/2006 9:33:09 AM EDT i live a few houses down from his homestead Custer's greatest chance for success likely would have relied on him scouting the camps location and attacking with his combined force (including the earlier refused Gatling guns) along the route, the Reno's division had taken

General Custer upon realizing Gatling Guns may have been worth the hassle. Colorized c.1876. 24 comments. share. save. hide. report. 97% Upvoted. This thread is archived. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. Sort by. best. level 1. 1 | 89 points · 1 year ago · edited 1 year ago Terry and Gibbon did offer Custer some reinforcements for the mission. Custer refused the battery of Gatling guns. Since the massive guns would have to be drawn by horses no longer fit for cavalry service, he felt they would be an impediment to his mobility. He also refused another group of cavalrymen, the 2nd Cavalry

If Custer had Gatling guns, would his command have

  1. Never before has a historically accurate novel telling of the day-to-day journey to the Little Big Horn featuring interesting characters been written, including the Gatling Gun Battery commander and his men. Custer takes his three Gatling Guns with him instead of leaving them at the Yellowstone River. The author, a retired Marine, came up with a plausible solution of how the heavy machine guns.
  2. Historian Robert M. Utley, in a section entitled Would Gatling Guns Have Saved Custer? presents two judgments from Custer's contemporaries: General Henry J. Hunt , expert in the tactical use of artillery in Civil War, stated that Gatlings would probably have saved the command, whereas General Nelson A. Miles , participant in the Great Sioux.
  3. But as was his choice to for go lugging Gatling Guns around as it slow his movements, Custer would have likewise taken shortcuts to advance his political career. It wasn't that Custer was a genius. Far from it. He was last in his class at the military academy
  4. The myth of the Gatling guns left behind just won't die. Those Gatling guns were not like M60's or M249's. They were huge, heavy guns, mounted on carriages like cannons. No one, repeat no one, who saw that terrain thought that Custer could have possibly taken Gatlings with him up and down hills and across ravines
  5. i gun for.

Critics point out that Custer made strategic errors from the start of the campaign, refusing the use of a battery of Gatling guns and General Terry's offer of an additional battalion of the 2nd Cavalry led by Capt. James S. Brisbin. Custer's reasoning was that the Gatling guns would impede his march up the Rosebud and hamper his mobility Custer set a maximum price and it caused his arrest. But all the high army officers were with him and he was given a command at the place I spoke of. On July 22 Custer's outfit drew 15 days' rations off the steamboat Far West that was in the river. There were two Rodman guns, two Gatling guns in a battery with Custer FAR AHEAD OF its time, the Gatling gun was misunderstood and not properly employed by the military in the 19th Century. General Custer had four 90-pound tripod-mounted .45-70 Gatling guns that could have resulted in the Battle of the Little Bighorn being a massacre of Sioux Indians instead of 7th Cavalry men, had he not left them behind And if he had brought gatling guns, they'd probably have stayed back with Reno & Benteen anyway, so they wouldn't have helped Custer out of his predicament on Custer Hill. A more serious problem was that, having left the sabers behind, Custer's men had no effective hand-to-hand weapons to fall back on once their ammo ran out

Would Custer's Last Stand have turned out different if he

Custer's Gatling Guns Command Post Game

Gatling guns were famously not used at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, also known as Custer's Last Stand, when Gen. George Armstrong Custer chose not to bring Gatlings with his main force. In April 1867, a Gatling gun was purchased for the Argentine Army by minister Domingo F. Sarmiento under instructions from president Bartolomé Mitre Custer left behind a quarter of his personnel, his command's sabers, anything that would slow down his troopers (supply wagons, ambulances), and his artillery battery-the latter included three-inch rifles and Gatling guns. The 1876 Gatling gun was an artillery piece and of little value to a mobile column engaged in counterinsurgency A Gatling Gun Can Spray Bullets Like Water from a Garden Hose. And it Change History. During the latter part of the 19th century, Gatling guns became more and more popular, and were used in the many wars that flared during the 1880s and 1890s. The 1879 war between England and the African Zulu tribes was the first major land action in. No different engagement strategy or Gatling or faster horses would have saved Custer. Some pilots have a saying about an undetected malfunction that causes a fatal crash He was dead when he left the ground. I have not read scholarly works about the battle, but have been to the site, and had the visitor's center lecture in '87 and read the. The Gatling wasn't much seen in the filed during the Plains Wars, since the War Department, thinking in terms of coast defense, had mostly bought 1 guns, which were really unwieldy - think 12-pdr SB or 4.5 MLR siege guns. All the nonsense about Custer leaving the Gatlings behind tends to overlook that fact

One thing that Custer did not know about was the number of Indians there would be. If he had known in advance from the Indian Bureau (who were the only one who could have known how many Indians there were). Then maybe he would have accepted the extra men and Gatling guns and have a better chance of defeating them Custer refused the guns because of mobility questions. The more likely outcome of bringing the guns would have been a delay of his arrival at the Indian camp making a rendezvous with Terry's column possible. Consequently a much larger cavalry force would have advanced on the camp The Battle of Little Bighorn happened 133 years ago today. George Custer and his men were certainly outnumbered, but their defeat may have also been assured by the Lakota and Cheyenne warriors' superior weaponry. If the Indians were, in fact, better armed at the Battle of the Little Bighorn, Custer may have contributed to the situation by declining to include Gatling guns in his van

Custer and the Gatling guns Little Bighorn History

Some number of rifles and the Gatling Guns chambered in .45-70 could theoretically handle longer engagements and penetrate hasty defensive positions while lever action carbines could provide. Custer declined an offer of a battery of Gatling guns because he believed the guns would impede his march. If he had taken them they would have saved his regiment - not because of their firepower but because they would have slowed his march causing him to arrive at least two days later Custer's defenders, however, have asserted that Gatling guns would have been slow and cumbersome in crossing the rough country between the Yellowstone and the Little Bighorn. To Custer, speed in gaining the battlefield was essential and of more importance The Battle of the Little Bighorn—also known as Custer's Last Stand—was the most ferocious battle of the Sioux Wars. Colonel George Custer and his men never stood a fighting chance. Under. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Custer Refused Dr Gatling's Diabolical Machine Gun+Ames,Butler,Breihan,Colt at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products

Battle of the Little Bighorn: Could Gatling Guns have made

The Gatling gun is one of the best-known early rapid-fire weapons and a forerunner of the modern machine gun. Invented by Richard Gatling, it is known for its use by the Union forces during the American Civil War in the 1860s, which was the first time it was employed in combat. Later it was used in the Boshin War, the Anglo-Zulu War and still. After the original UMS was released a number of users created Little Bighorn scenarios that included Custer's famous Gatling guns. (For more information about Custer's Gatling guns click here.) Custer, of course, refused to take the battery (either two or three guns) because he feared it would slow down his column Since the thread asks our opinions about Custer during the CW, whatever the guns might have been is off-topic. During the war, Custer gave his men elan. Within a short period after Gettysburg, his men purchased and wore the red scarves like the one sported by their young commander I just wanted to let you know I have more delays in those states than any others. (yes, that has happened). My price is clearly listed. I just try to break even with my fees. Hopefully, you can see that Historian Robert M. Utley, in a section entitled Would Gatling Guns had Saved Custer? presents two judgments from Custer's contemporaries: General Henry J. Hunt, expert in the tactical use of artillery in Civil War, stated that Gatlings would probably have saved the command, whereas General Nelson A. Miles, participant in the.

Feared and Hated: Meet the Powerful Gatling Gun The

Having being too late to stop them, Custer grew ever more frustrated. In 1881, when tensions between the CSA and USA boiled over the purchase of Sonora and Chihuahua from the Mexicans, Custer finally got his chance for revenge. While waiting for orders, two Gatling guns arrived at Fort Dodge in preparatio General Terry and others claimed that Custer made strategic errors from the start of the campaign. For instance, he refused to use a battery of Gatling guns, and turned down General Terry's offer of an additional battalion of the 2nd Cavalry. Custer believed that the Gatling guns would impede his march up the Rosebud and hamper his mobility George Custer in The Guns of the South []. George Armstrong Custer was a brevet general in the U.S. Army during the Second American Revolution.In 1864, when Hugh Kilpatrick attempted to rescue Union prisoners of war held at Belle Isle and in Libby Prison, Custer moved his troops west toward Charlottesville to draw C.S. General Richard Ewell away from Kilpatrick's line of attack

Here Is the Story Behind the Terrifying Gatling Gun The

June 25, 1876: Was Custer Outgunned at Little Bighorn? WIRE

Would Obama have saved General Custer at Little Bighorn

Gatling guns had saved Carson's troops from annihilation in the Battle of Adobe Walls 1864, but Custer did not expect to be in a defensive position and would not know what to do if he was. General Nelson A. Miles commented on their usefulness: I am not surprised that poor Custer declined taking them, he said And while handguns aren't considered a weapon that would win or lose a battle, the '73 revolver may have played a unique role during Custer's last stand. One of the last, and perhaps most controversial, criticisms of Custer's tactics was his decision to leave behind the powerful Gatling gun We have followed the fortunes of the command save the five troops with Custer. What of them? After Reno crossed the Little Big Horn to attack at 2:30 p.m., Custer continued on down the right bank for a short distance and watered his animals at a branch of Reno Creek, and then bearing more to the right passed up a long ridge and just to the east.

The Gatling Gun: A Civil War Innovation - Warfare History

Before the battle, General Terry offered Custer the use of two Gatling guns. He, however, refused, saying that the 7th Regiment will cope with everything encounters to mean that it does not need such inventions. H istorians debated whether taking these weapons w ould have change d the outcome of the battle Custer led a regiment of under 700 U.S. soldiers against a Native force believed to have been numbered over 2,000, and got beat worse than a stutterer at a spelling bee. Since then, Custer's name has been synonymous with arrogance, unpreparedness, underestimating one's opponents, and a delectable cream-based dessert sauce

I offered Custer the battery of Gatling guns, but he declined it, saying that it might embarrass him, that he was strong enough without it. The movements proposed by Gen. Gibbon's coumn were carried out to the letter, and had the attack been deferred until it was up, I cannot doubt that we should have been sucessful The basic details of Custer's cock-up at the battle of the Little Bighorn have been debated to a standstill and it is now broadly accepted that, having refused a battery of Gatling Guns (which would have evened things up no end) and told the men to leave behind their sabers as there was not going to be any close-quarter fighting, Custer ignored all intelligence from his scouts regarding the. That video doesn't give a an accurate feel for the sound of that thing. It's a ROAR.I used to have a high-quality recording of an M61 Vulcan Gatling Gun. 20mm at 4,000 or 6,000 rounds per minute. Pretty impressive sound -- a ~ 100 herz wall of noise. Especially when pumped through a pair of Klipschhorns at max volume. : Several hundred U.S. Army troops led by Lt. Col. George Custer were sent in. They were quickly overwhelmed and killed by up to 3,000 Indian warriors. Custer's Last Stand is marked today at the Little Bighorn Battlefield National Monument in Montana. When we were in the neighborhood, we got a tour from local historian Putt Thompson The Gatling gun did see some limited use in the Civil War, but it wasn't officially adopted by the U.S. military until 1866 when it was used by the U.S. Cavalry on the frontier - however, one Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer chose not to bring his Gatling guns with his force at the time of the Battle of Little Bighorn

[TMP] Custer's Gatling Guns PHOTOS Topi

The newly patented Gatling Gun was the earliest machine gun and had completed its trials. Custer had two to four of the guns and abundant ammunition available when he set out to uproot a small Indian village on the bank of the Little Bighorn River. Custer's reasoning behind not using them was that the Gatling guns would impede his march. General Custer's men discover the harsh life of Western Plains will not remove the horrors of the Civil War and the Native Americans have the spectre of the gatling gun looming over them Red River War U,S army used Gatling Gun Mountain Howitzer was broken down into 3 loads for Pack Animals 7TH Cavalry Regiment 45 Officers and 718 Troopers During the Campaign 31 Officers 566 men in 12 Companies numbered A to M Indians between 1500-2500 warriors Custer left his Gatling Guns behind because he thought the gatlings to cumbersom By Allan B. Colombo, WMD Author Editor's Note: The study of George Custer and the Battle of the Little Bighorn is not an easy one by any means. No amount of work done by WMD writers could ever equal the thousands and thousands of pages written concerning Custer's last battle at the Little Bighorn. We can, however, provide some interesting facts, some of which I had never heard before

Custer's reasoning behind not using them was that the Gatling guns would impede his march and hamper his mobility. More importantly, he also is said to have believed that the use of so devastating a weapon would cause him to lose face with the Indians. Considering reports of Custer's vanity, this is not hard to believe The Indians had recovered plenty of ammunition from Custer's 210 men, as well as a great deal from the confrontation with George Crook eight days earlier, and they far outnumbered anything Terry could throw at them. Terry had Gatling guns, but the Indians would not have known this and the weapons were never employed White Cow Bull claimed to have shot a leader wearing a buckskin jacket off his horse in the river. [130], General Alfred Terry's Dakota column included a single battery of artillery, comprising two 3-inch Ordnance rifle and two Gatling guns. Custer's Last Stand